See visions in a bowl of Fruit Loops in Eric Slick’s new instrumental guitar video “Release”

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Slick1Dr. Dog drummer Eric Slick has been on something of a creative streak from both behind the drum kit (the band’s great new record B-Room) and away from it. Last night, he shared a surreal music video for his new solo song “Release.” Musically, it’s is a contemplative instrumental featuring fingerpicked acoustic guitar, similar to but more refined than the “Creature Comfort” track he put on Bandcamp in June.

Visually, it’s an unsettling bud oddly comical trip into the human psyche via a bowl of Fruit Loops. Like the short film Primal Essence that Slick premiered at The Key’s Tuesday Tune-Out back in January, this video – directed by by Zia Anger and Miles Joris-Peyrafitte – begins in a slightly askew real world with Slick just awake, doing morning things like eating breakfast. As soon as he’s finished, his world becomes a dream-like state.

“Release” will be featured on Slick’s debut solo guitar LP <em>Out of Habit</em>, which will be available on limited edition vinyl and cassette via Solid Gold Record. Preorders are available at the label’s website.

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2 Responses to “See visions in a bowl of Fruit Loops in Eric Slick’s new instrumental guitar video “Release””

  1. Philadelphia

    How is this song even noteworthy? This guy can’t even play guitar, let alone record it even remotely well at all..

    You guys really need to get your heads out of your butts and focus more on the other amazing musicians in this city.

    Reply
    • John Vettese

      Wow, Philadelphia, you must have extremely high standards for what constitutes “good” guitar playing, since I dug this. Tell us, who’s guitar playing would you prefer we focus on? As for the recording quality, there’s this whole contemporary musical aesthetic called “lo-fi” – it’s been around for the past twenty years, perhaps you’re familiar with it – and even though Eric’s song is a lot more polished than most of what falls under the “lo-fi” umbrella, that might be what you’re hearing. The idea that capturing a live performance with a raw, unfussy recording casts a much more honest vibe than spending tens of thousands of dollars on studio time to get something bland and soulless. But, you know, to each their own.

      Reply

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