This Day in Music History: Buddy Holly records his last songs, Meatloaf releases Bat Out Of Hell

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Meatloaf Bat Out Of Hell

1908 – The first two-sided vinyl record is offered for sale by the Columbia label in an ad running in this week’s Saturday Evening Post.

1958 – Buddy Holly’s last recording session takes place at Pythian Temple Studios in New York City. The songs recorded include “Raining In My Heart,” “Moondreams,” and “It Doesn’t Matter Anymore,” which becomes a #1 hit.

1965 – The Beatles record “Norwegian Wood (This Bird Has Flown)” and “Nowhere Man.”

1977 – Meatloaf releases Bat Out Of Hell.

1978 – The Clash fire their manager, Bernie Rhodes, saying the band and record company “found him hard to deal with.” Melody Maker journalist Caroline Coon takes his place.

1995 – Shannon Hoon of Blind Melon dies of a cocaine overdose at age 28.

1996 – A former executive of EMI Records, Jay Barbieri, announces the launch J-Bird Records, at www.j-birdrecords.com. The record label is the first of its kind: a label that operates almost exclusively on the World Wide Web.

1997 – The Guinness Book Of Records declares Elton John’s “Candle In The Wind 97” as the biggest selling single record of all time, with 31.8 million sales in less than 40 days and raising more than £20 million for charity.

1999 – George Martin, who produced most of the Beatles albums, lends his reputation and four decades of music business experience to a start-up Internet company catering to unsigned bands. Martin announces that he will serve as chairman of the advisory board for Garageband.com.

2003 – The singer/songwriter Elliott Smith dies of self-inflicted stab wounds to the chest at age 34 in Los Angeles, California.

2003 – The posthumous album Streetcore by Joe Strummer & The Mescaleros is released 10 months after Strummer’s death.

 

Information for this post was gathered from This Day in Music, The Music History Calendar, On This Day, and Wikipedia.

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