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The left-of-center Lake Street Dive kicks off a two-night stand at Union Transfer in style

Lake Street Dive | Photo By Noah Silvestry | silvestography.com
Lake Street Dive | Photo By Noah Silvestry | silvestography.com

I hate to write reviews that sound like movie trailers, but the following needs to be said. In a world where much is the same, Lake Street Dive do things differently. In a world where drummers tune their toms low enough to make your innards shudder, Mike Calabrese tunes up (I’m also pretty sure he plays Spizzichino cymbals, which are any jazz drummer’s dream). In a world where, anywhere outside jazz clubs, low notes come from an electric bass, Bridget Kearny plays upright. In a world where bands seek to fill out their sound, Lake Street Dive strips it down. But being different only gets the glass to half empty. Lucky for me (and the rest of the sold out Union Transfer crowd), Rachel Price is nothing short of a virtuoso and the whole band seemed to be having more fun than just about anyone I’ve seen on the UT stage. I suppose there’s a reason there was a line around the block on a frosty Philly evening to see the Boston natives last night. Continue reading →

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Kopecky Family Band keeps us coming back at Union Transfer

Kopecky Family Band | Photo By Noah Silvestry | silvestography.com
Kopecky Family Band | Photo By Noah Silvestry | silvestography.com

It’s no secret that the Kopecky Family Band is not really a family, but with or without shared bloodlines, these Nashville rockers managed to make us all feel at home Friday night at Union Transfer. Their records are solid, of course, but there’s something about seeing them live that brings out something that’s just plain likable. Frontman Gabe Simon humbly introduced himself to the front row as he set up his own pedalboards. He even remembered seeing me at their killer TLA show from about a year back. But a nice guy does not a great musician make; we care about the sounds, and there’s a reason the Kopecky Family Band continues to have me coming back for more. Continue reading →

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Warpaint played a blistering, mystifying set at Union Transfer

Warpaint | Photo By Noah Silvestry | silvestography.com
Warpaint | Photo By Noah Silvestry | silvestography.com

I’ve long said that Warpaint’s 2014 self-titled LP was the kind of music Radiohead should be making. Then again, the very fact that the Los Angeles 4-piece is churning out records at (or really, above) the standard of the most influential band in music is saying something (and it’s not just because they too work with Nigel Godrich). And by no means is Warpaint just another Radiohead pastiche project; they’ve nestled themselves quite comfortably into their own corner of the music world. So while you might think it would be entirely unfair to compare what happened last night to a Radiohead show, the very fact that I can’t get Warpaint’s ethereal images and haunting sounds out of my head is testimony that really, you can. Continue reading →

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From outer space to the E-Factory, Broken Bells impress

Broken Bells | Photo By Noah Silvestry | silvestography.com
Broken Bells | Photo By Noah Silvestry | silvestography.com

The NSEA Protector has landed, and its shipmates might just be human. Only the spaceship is actually Broken Bells’ set of sci-fi stage adornments and the shipmates happen to be James Mercer and Danger Mouse (Brian Burton), two of the 21st century’s champions of songcraft. It’s no secret that this unlikely duo aspires to an astral cyborg aura, their 2010 video for “The Ghost Inside” featuring Mad Men’s Christina Hendricks as a cash poor humanoid on a space shuttle in search of her dream planet. But try as you may, there’s no keeping these guys from touching down on Earth to put on a stellar dynamic – and notably human – live concert. Continue reading →

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Indie diety J Mascis plays an understated set at World Cafe Live

J Mascis | Photo By Noah Silvestry | silvestography.com
J Mascis | Photo By Noah Silvestry | silvestography.com

If intentionally underachieving, blasé, slacker indie rock is your thing, J Mascis is your guy. I don’t mean to say that the man Spin ranked 5th on their list of the 100 greatest guitarists of all time doesn’t care about his art – quite the contrary. His croaky drone of a voice is, in its own weird way, quite expressive, and the dude shreds on 6 strings like no other. But if you expect this god of the indie-est of rock to put on a mind-blowing performance (as I unknowingly did), you are in for a world of disappointment. Continue reading →

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Tweedy’s introspective father-son jams hit close to home

Tweedy | Photo By Noah Silvestry | silvestography.com
Tweedy | Photo By Noah Silvestry | silvestography.com

It was not long ago that I would find myself spending countless weekends behind my drum set, my father on his guitar, simply jamming it out. There was no forethought, no production, no mission statement, but instead the simple joy of spontaneous creation. Similar in this father-son low key rock philosophy is Tweedy – Jeff, Wilco’s beloved introvert frontman, and his 18 year-old son Spencer. Their double album, Sukierae, drops on September 23 and is currently available for first listen on NPR. It’s the product of candid father-son fragmented composition, and charges 2 sides of music with mellow introspection. It is named for Jeff’s wife, Sue “Sukie” Miller, who battled cancer during the the album’s recording. For obvious reasons, Tweedy’s music hits very close to home, and seeing it live made it feel that much closer. Continue reading →

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The Black Keys headline a two-hour hit parade at Wells Fargo Center

The Black Keys | Photo By Noah Silvestry | silvestography.com
The Black Keys | Photo By Noah Silvestry | silvestography.com

The Black Keys were born in a basement and have since evolved into one of the 21st century’s defining sounds. Their aesthetic, a unique tone developed with the help of none other than Danger Mouse, is unparalleled. And while you may know them by one of their countless hits from their 3 consecutive top-five albums over the past 5 years, their catalogue is extensive and the quality of songwriting hasn’t dared falter since the group’s inception in 2001. Frontman Dan Auerbach’s voice couldn’t be more soulful, his guitar playing more skilled, and we might as well go ahead and call Patrick Carney the epitome of hard-hitting indie-rock drums. All of this is to say that you’d expect a damn good show from this celebrated rock duo, and that’s just what Philly got. Continue reading →

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Keeping rock and roll dreams alive with Tom Petty at the Wells Fargo Center

Tom Petty | Photo By Noah Silvestry | silvestography.com
Tom Petty | Photo By Noah Silvestry | silvestography.com

If you told me that a dude who’s about to turn 64 was capable of drawing 20,000 Philadelphians out to the Wells Fargo center (that’s right, the place that unabashedly charges about $8.00 for a slice of Lorenzo’s pizza that would normally run you $3.00, but I’m not bitter) on a Monday night during an Eagles game no less, I’d crack a smile and say, “good one”. But that joke is a reality and that dude is Tom Petty, a man who is undoubtedly the world’s most offhand rockstar. But Petty wasn’t alone in his blithe glory; his quintessential almost all-American (drummer Steve Ferrone hails from Brighton, England) backing band, The Heartbreakers, was not just equally old, but equally killin’. Continue reading →

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Tragic, Wonderful, Triumphant: Lorde continues to impress at The Mann Center

Lorde | Photo By Noah Silvestry | silvestography.com
Lorde | Photo By Noah Silvestry | silvestography.com

It’s been a year since Lorde’s “Royals” topped the musical richter scale, and her streak of teenage stardom has shown no signs of slowing anytime soon. Her show at The Mann Center last night kicked off a second US tour in support of her subsequent Pure Heroine LP, which still has some fans reeling. Continue reading →

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Imperfect Perfection: Neutral Milk Hotel plays an elated set at the Mann Center

There’s probably no indie rock group surrounded by more enigma than Neutral Milk Hotel. Their second record, In The Aeroplane Over The Sea, is considered by many to be one of those elusive perfect albums. I’m not quite sure about perfect (maybe it’s just that I have a minor beef with “King of Carrot Flowers Pt. 2”, but not 3), but it’s certainly a record unlike anything else I’ve ever heard. To add to the intrigue, the band’s auteur, Jeff Mangum, played white rabbit in a magic trick and, for all intents and purposes, disappeared from the public eye a year after Aeroplane‘s release. After a decade of near hermitage, Mangum started playing shows, and has just recently reunited the original Aeroplane lineup for a reunion tour. Even though he’s no longer in mysterious hiding, he refuses to give an interview, record a followup record, or even be photographed. I guess it’s a case of wanting the music to speak for itself, but the world may never really know. So just as with any great indie rock show, music geeks, hipsters and fans of beards alike made their way out to The Mann Center on a beautiful midsummer evening to hear the most mystifying act in music. Continue reading →