By

Course Correction: Philly four-piece Corey Flood plays with menacing moods and vulnerable lyrics

Corey Flood | photo courtesy of the artist
Corey Flood | photo by Emily Lyon | courtesy of the artist

Few things ever go according to plan, as the members of West Philly four-piece Corey Flood know all too well. Less than a year ago, their band emerged from a series of fortuitous course corrections: The spin-off of a Ween cover band switched up its lineup and started writing dark pop originals. Soon after, their hasty first stab at recording demos earned them a deal with Fire Talk and became their debut EP, Wish You Hadn’t. That EP, due out on February 23, comprises four songs that feel equal parts sinister and vulnerable. In them, frontwoman Ivy Gray-Klein is haunted and hushed, singing as a survivor of emotional warfare.

On a recent Saturday, the members of Corey Flood — Gray-Klein on bass and vocals, Em Boltz on guitar and vocals, Noah Jacobson-Carroll on guitar, and Juliette Rando on drums — met me for coffee on their way to practice at Planet Phitness, the performance space that Juliette runs in the house she and Noah share. They’ll be hosting their EP release show there tomorrow night , with support from Empath, Eight, and Preen. Continue reading →

By

Awakening the Feminine: Mhysa’s E. Jane on harnessing the power of softness

Mhysa | photo by Naima Green | courtesy of the artist
Mhysa | photo by Naima Green | courtesy of the artist

Conceptual artist E. Jane is, to put it in their own words, “always working on all cylinders.” In addition to pursuing an M.F.A. in interdisciplinary art, which they completed last year, E. has been performing as one half of the electronic duo SCRAAATCH since 2013, and exhibiting work in galleries across the globe for nearly as long. This summer, E. stepped out as a solo musical act, releasing fantasii, the debut album of their popstar alter-ego, Mhysa.

On fantasii, which is set for a vinyl release later this month, music is imagined as a space of resistance for Mhysa and other Black women and femmes, foregrounding joy, affection, and sexuality as a gesture of opposition to those who would rather hold them down. The Key spoke with E. about the origins of the Mhysa project, the intersections of art and music, and the nature of resistance. Continue reading →