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The Key Studio Sessions: Found Wild

For singer-songwriter Tim Arnold, the band Found Wild began as a journey of self-discovery.

Best known in the XPN universe as the energetic percussionist at the backbone of local indie folk-pop faves Good Old War, Arnold took a hiatus from his main band a few years back to step back from the brink that the hard-touring, regularly-partying lifestyle had brought him to. He sobered up, he and his partner had a child, and he began writing songs that, for the first time, were wholly his own. Songs were he was the focal point, not the backing vocalist singing harmonies over the drumbeat; songs about his life and experiences.

As he described it when I interviewed the band this summer, this newfound clarity opened the floodgates. Continue reading →

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Found Wild drops first full release following two teaser singles

Found Wild | photo by Dylan Eddinger for WXPN | dylaneddingerphoto.squarespace.com

Found Wild, a new project featuring Good Old War members Keith Goodwin and Tim Arnold, released their debut EP while out on the road with Anthony Green and his Avalon 10 Year Anniversary Tour. If you’re lucky enough to see them live this summer, then you’ll hear this masterful new collection of songs front to back.

Leading up to the release, Found Wild teased us with two singles, “Weatherman” and “Nothing Gold Can Last.” The rest of the songs follow the singles’ themes of loss, regret, and forgiveness, and the cool thing is, if you know anything about the relationship between Arnold and Goodwin, then you get to glimpse the most deeply personal parts of it through this new music. Found Wild is the second-winded passion project that pulled Arnold out of the darkness and back into his life, and these songs are sort of like apologetic and explanatory letters to himself and the people he loves about where he was and how he’s ready to move on to a brighter future. Continue reading →

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Found Wild releases second single “Weatherman,” a somber ballad dedicated to change

Found Wild
Found Wild | photo courtesy of the artist

Tim Arnold and Keith Goodwin of Good Old War have finally given us a release date for Found Wild‘s forthcoming self-titled EP: July 20th. That’s just Days Away (hahaha), and to celebrate, we have a new single to check out. “Weatherman” is the somber track of the album, and if you caught the Avalon Tour at the TLA last week, then you know this since they played all of them for a captivated audience. Continue reading →

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Found Wild channels deeply personal themes into beautiful country tones on “Nothing Gold Can Last”

Found Wild
Found Wild | photo courtesy of the artist

When I met up with Tim Arnold and Keith Goodwin last week at Spruce Street Harbor Park, they had a big week ahead of them. Tour was a week away, and they had to rehearse for three completely different sets. One is for singer-songwriter Anthony Green (of Circa Survive and more), whose backing band they play in; he will be performing his debut solo album Avalon in full for its tenth anniversary. Another is for their long-running band, Good Old War, who is direct support the show and celebrating an anniversary of their own; Only Way To Be Alone, the album that launched them into the folk-infused modern rock zone with the super poppy “Coney Island,” is also ten years old.

But most significantly for these two Bucks County born-and-raised musicians is the opening band for the night: Found Wild, their new duo project based around Arnold’s songwriting. Though he’s always been a vocalist as part of Good Old War’s three-part harmony ensemble, this project marks his first time singing lead. It’s also his first time as the primary songwriter in a band, and after an emotionally taxing handful of years, he had a lot to sing about.

Continue reading →

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New Good Old War side project Found Wild to debut new music on June 25th

Yesterday, WXPN debuted “Nothing Gold Can Last” by Found Wild, a new project comprised of Good Old War members Keith Goodwin and Tim Arnold, and if you don’t think I’m the MOST excited about this collab, then you’re wrong. (They’re at the very beginning stages, so an Instagram link is all I can share with you at the moment). To make it even better, they’ll be opening Anthony Green’s Avalon tour this summer before Good Old War in its entirety takes the stage. It’s a little mind-boggling, everybody just playing within different variations of the same band, but I have hope that Found Wild will stray from the typical GOW sound into something more unique. Continue reading →

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Experimentation, Empowerment, Connectedness: Talking with the SELTZER party founders about their first year of LGBT clubbing in West Philly

A Seltzer party in West Philly | photo by Evie Yui-Ha | @snaxho_ | courtesy of the artist

Sometime in the previous decade, Philadelphia’s underground LGBT / queer community stepped out of the pit and onto the dancefloor, oftentimes transforming those same basements and living rooms that nurtured punk rock and other alternative bands into clubs. Powered amps were lugged, turntables were plugged in, and mics were checked. Out of this explosion of banging beats, and with the influence of Philly’s groundbreaking vogue/ballroom scene, the eponymous “queer dance party” was born. Venues like Elena’s Soul and the Treehouse were West Philly staples, where DJ’s like Seltzer’s DJ Precolumbian carved out a musical identity for themselves despite the odds volleyed at marginalized people.

Seltzer is that new, new though; a roving party building on the legacy of queer involvement in house, techno, hip hop and dance music, injected with the raw, nervous energy of downtown ’80’s New York. As such, it’s more than a movement and difficult to pin down to one specific sound. Certainly, there is the ever-present vogue battle beats or the syncopated rhythm and bash of Philly / Jersey club blasting out of speakers. But its playlist is also informed by world music, EDM, and experimental music– like a Soundcloud autoplaying from a queer, utopian Cybertron. With this eclectic, yet culturally refined soundtrack, DJ Precolumbian, along with Bearcat and the whole Seltzer squad, are all set to push boundaries, move bodies, and foster community all at once. With their one-year anniversary party happening this weekend, we sat down with Precolumbian and got the entire dish on Seltzer and what these parties mean for the future of queer dance sounds in Philly and beyond. Continue reading →

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Listen to Gene Wildest’s genre bending stoner opus Spectral Terrestrial

Gene Wildest | photo via genewildest.com

It’s not easy to write an introduction for Gene Wildest. The Philadelphia rockers can channel the whole of guitar-rock history in the span of a song, mixing genres as freely as spices. On their new LP, Spectral Terrestrial, GW draw from doom metal, space rock, shoegaze, math rock, and more to sustain an absorbing spaced-out atmosphere. Continue reading →

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Now Hear This: New songs from Andy Jenkins, Gang Gang Dance, Gorillaz, Arp, LUMP, Wilder Maker, and more

Orquesta Akokán | via orquestaakokan.bandcamp.com

Every month, noted song expert K. Ross Hoffman presents Now Hear This, a sampling of fresh specimens for your consideration.

Aw yeah, summer. The entropy, the lethargy, the visceral extremes.  Now, summer makes all sorts of things weird anyway, but I feel like summertime in music-land has gotten especially wonky in recent years. Basically, my take is that the focus on large-scale music festivals which has ballooned over the past decade or so has taken a palpable bite out of non-festival-centric touring itineraries, and thus summer concert calendars, and even, indirectly, album release schedules. (Aside from the overwhelming hype cavalcade of Drake, Jay-Zeyonce and Kanye and Co. all dropping within a matter of weeks, the last few weeks have felt a bit thin for noteworthy new releases, and the rest of July and August, peering ahead, are looking even sparser.) Maybe I’d be less sore about all this if I felt closer to the target audience for either Firefly or Made in America, but as it stands those festivals’ biggest impact on me, personally, has been (presumably) shutting Philly out of proper local headline dates for the makers of some of my favorite music of the year: Janelle Monáe, for instance, and Amen Dunes.

Still, there’s plenty that’s worth seeing, concert-wise, in the coming weeks – it just feels like (even) more of an unpredictable hodge-podge than usual. Some of it is coming in the form of smaller, locally-targeted festivals: there’s XPN’s own XPoNential Festival, of course, and the decidedly weirder and more DIY All Mutable Summer Jam which is running the same weekend (July 27th-28th); I’m also pretty hyped about the free, Latin Roots-affiliated Nuevofest which is coming up this Sunday (read on for more about that.)

Anyhow, this being summertime, what do you say we all take a trip? Just a little musical vacation around the globe and beyond, to points both familiar and strange; real, imaginary and somewhere in between. I can’t say that it will all be straightforward or entirely uncomplicated – what is nowadays, after all – but I do promise we’ll have some fun along the way. And it’ll feel oh so nice to arrive back home at the end.

Continue reading →

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Tormato: Watch prog titans Yes wild out at The Spectrum in June of 1979

Yes at the Spectrum | still from video

When UK progressive / psych rock trailblazers Yes took their ninth album Tormato to the road in 1979, it was the last run of their classic lineup. A year later, founding vocalist Jon Anderson departed the band, along with Rick Wakeman, the keyboard virtuoso whose playing defined the band’s sound in the 1970s. Although Anderson did rejoin the band’s ranks by the “Owner of a Lonely Heart” era, and Wakeman was back on board for a few stints in the 90s, the split at the turn of the 80s marked a dramatic shift in the band’s identity.

This Tormato tour performance, filmed live at The Spectrum on June 20th, 1979, captures the final time the adventurous Yes of its initial incarnation played Philly. Continue reading →

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Ryan Tennis and the Clubhouse Band pay tribute to rock great Tom Petty with beautiful rendition of “Wildflowers”

Ryan Tennis & The Clubhouse Band in “Wildflowers” – Tom Petty Tribute performance video

The world lost a rock legend three days ago when Tom Petty shockingly passed away at 66 years old. Musicians everywhere have been mourning his loss in the best way they know how: covering some of Petty’s best records.

This week, the WXPN studio hosted Ryan Tennis and his Clubhouse Band for a Key Studio Session we’ll release later this fall. After it was done, they played a gorgeous version of the Petty classic “Wildflowers.” Wildflowers the album was Petty’s second solo album and it gives a more well-rounded look his musical abilities in terms of instrumentation and higher-tech production. “Wildflowers” is a heartfelt, sing-songy love record that has always been begging to be covered and Tennis and his band do just that. In this studio session, the Clubhouse band consisted of seven musicians (including Tennis) playing a slew of instruments from electric guitar to a shaker, but all of the musicians add their own unique vocals to create a very pretty harmony that fits perfectly with the soft strumming chord progression of Tennis’ acoustic guitar. Continue reading →