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Native Harrow wants you to know that they will not make happier music

Native Harrow | still from video

Regionally-rooted folk duo Native Harrow offered a response to listeners that are tired of sad songs in the title track to their new album Happier Now. In an interview with Folk Radio UK, singer-songwriter and guitarist Devin Tuel defends her decision not to make “feel-good” music and cites her age as a reason she has learned to stop people pleasing. If she wanted to, she could make happy music, but she likes tackling subjects that might disconcert her, or upset her head on.

While her explanation might seem hyper specific, the song and its lyrics are open enough to be capable of resonating with a lot of people. Without context, it is a song for anyone that has decided to ignore the opinions of others to find peace within themselves.  Continue reading →

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Listen to Native Harrow’s full Folkadelphia session and catch them tomorrow night at Boot & Saddle

Native Harrow | photo by Gabriela Barbieri for WXPN

Last month we got a taste of Native Harrow‘s arresting Folkadelphia session with “Can’t Go On Like This” and now we finally have the full thing and an opportunity to see the duo live. Their four-track Folkadelphia and The Key session from April is now streaming. Much like in their performance of “Can’t Go On Like This”, the three other songs glisten. Devin Tuel sing with her usual impressive and moving tone. The intimacy of the session makes it feel as if she’s singing right into your ear, making the already moving songs even more gripping.  Continue reading →

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Watch Native Harrow perform “Can’t Go On Like This” in WXPN studios for Folkadelphia

Native Harrow | photo by Gabriela Barbieri for WXPN

Philly area singer-songwriter Devin Tuel founded her duo Native Harrow back in 2011 in Woodstock, New York, where she connected with drummer and multi-instrumentalist Stephen Harms; since then they’ve moved to Philly, then spent a nomadic year on the road, and as of this winter are back in the Chester County burbs with a new record called Happier Now under their belts. Continue reading →

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The Week Ahead: Radiator Hospital, Anderson .Paak, Jonatha Brooke, Native Harrow and more

Radiator Hospital | courtesy of the artist

Start the week out with hooky power-pop from Worriers. Wrap it up with dreamy folk by Native Harrow, or the propulsive Break Free Fest, centering marginalized artists in punk. In the middle, catch psych, funk, one timeless singer-songwriter, and so much more. Here are fourteen concerts to see in the next seven days all around Philly. Continue reading →

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Tonight’s Concert Picks: Native Harrow at Steel City, Mo Lowda and the Humble at The Foundry, Humbree at MilkBoy

Native Harrow | Photo via facebook.com/nativeharrow

Indie folk duo Native Harrow plays Steel City in Phoenixville tonight opening for Joseph Robert Knauss. The duo of Devin Tuel and Stephen Harms released their record Ghost in June, and it recalls Laura Marling and Beth Orton in its gripping minimalism. Watch the video for “Poor Beggar,” shot outside of Philadelphia, and get more information on the show at the XPN Concert Calendar. Continue reading →

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Dive head first into Harrowgrove’s haunted world with new album CAPS LOCK

Harrowgrove | via the artist's Bandcamp page
Harrowgrove | via the artist’s Bandcamp page

C.J. Davis’ Harrowgrove project has been steadily dropping music for a few years now, drawing from industrial, alternative R&B, trip hop, and more. It’s taken on many forms since its inception, but with Davis’ guiding hand, each release has maintained the nocturnal, occasionally creepy quality that makes Harrowgrove what it is. His newest full length, CAPS LOCK, is no exception. Continue reading →

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Harrowgrove’s “3AM// The Descent” is an exciting return to form

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A photo posted by C.J. Davis (@harrowgrove) on

About a year ago, New Jersey native C.J. Davis, AKA Harrowgrove, shifted from industrial rock to industrial R&B with 2015’s Holy Broken Free Spirit. He continued that trend earlier this year with The Chandler In The Room EP, and he already has a new album on the way. CAPS LOCK will be out next Groundhog’s Day, but for now, check out its first single, “3AM// The Descent.” Continue reading →

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Back to Star: A conversation with Tanya Donelly on the return of 90s alternative faves Belly

Belly | photo courtesy of the artist
Belly | photo courtesy of the artist

On an MTV set in 1993, Tanya Donelly was interviewed in support of Star, the debut record she’d just released with her new band Belly. She exchanged several minutes-worth of witty banter with Kennedy, the mononymous veejay who always seemed to face the challenge of having to concurrently contain her effusive enthusiasm and her runaway ADHD. By contrast, the singer shows a unique guile and sly introspection, an unassuming administrator of a remarkably sharp tongue. Dressed in dark clothing and smoking a cigarette, Donelly is clearly a little uneasy in the spotlight, as she humors the host’s exuberant if erratic interrogation. Prompted early in the interview to address her place as a frontwoman in a predominantly male industry, Donelly responds almost immediately, as though she’d already given it plenty of thought, “Kurt Cobain’s allowed to be Kurt Cobain, and Michael Stipe’s allowed to be Michael Stipe, but it’s really hard to find a niche as a female. They have to put you somewhere.”

When asked about that quote during a recent interview with us, she debriefs about the industry’s evolution over the last two decades, in that regard. “I do think that’s updatable now, happily.” Twenty-three years on, the singer has rallied her seminal ‘90s dream pop band Belly for a new record and a reunion tour – which makes a much anticipated stop in Philadelphia this Sunday at Union Transfer – and when asked to reflect again on the role she played in several ways as pioneering female voice in a generally male-dominated industry, she seems glad to revisit. “I don’t think that the glass ceiling is totally smashed, but I do think that women in music are sort of taken much more individually now than back then. And I also think it comes in cycles, you know, that that waxes and wanes for women. And so there will be spaces sort of where everything feels like it’s moving forward, and then there’ll be a step back. But I would say for the most part I think that the playing field is much more level now than it was in the ‘80s.” Continue reading →

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Tonight’s Concert Picks: Harrowgrove at Bourbon and Branch, Escort at Underground Arts, Shark Tape at Boot & Saddle and more…

 

Harrowgrove | photo courtesy of the artist
Harrowgrove | photo courtesy of the artist

Harrowgrove is the project of alternative R&B artist C.J. Davis and was one of John Vettese’s Top 5 music discoveries of 2015. Originally a guitar-based band, Davis slowly transformed Harrowgrove into music with intense soundscapes and trap influences with his release last September, Holy Broken Free Spirit. Davis will be bringing the music of Harrowgrove to Bourbon and Branch tonight with Starwood, Kim Jong Ill, and Revolution, I Love You. The show is $10 at the door and is 21+. Information can be found here.

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Watch Philly-native Joseph Robert Krauss perform “Around Here Anymore” live in Nashville

Photo via facebook.com
Photo via facebook.com

Joseph Robert Krauss, a Philly native and current Nashville resident, is a man who has been honing his craft for years and has arrived at a sound that is arresting in its sincerity and deft in its delivery. Krauss recently teamed up with Nashville based video production company, GemsOnVHS to record a superb live version of his song “Around Here Anymore.” Continue reading →