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Tonight’s Concert Picks: Summer Fiction at Johnny Brenda’s, Birds Of Maya at Kung Fu Necktie, An American Chinese at Danger Danger

Bill Ricchini

Whenever some seriously inclement weather—like, say, a freakish rainstorm—takes over the city, having a lack of worthwhile arts-and-entertainment options later in the evening is usually a good thing. That way, you don’t feel so bad about staying in the entire night, drying out your soaked clothes while drinking hot tea and watching re-runs of Law & Order. Unfortunately, there’s not one, not two, but three can’t miss shows going on tonight, all of which feature amazing local acts. So, Philadelphia: Get ready to get wet—again. At Johnny Brenda’s, Bill Ricchini celebrates the release of Summer Fiction, the debut album by his new indie-pop recording project of the same name (you can listen to the album here); In Grenada, which (re-)released its own stellar debut two months ago, opens (9 p.m., 21+, $10). Mike Polizze has recently been drawing a lot of attention with his latest side project, Purling Hiss. (Last month, he toured with Kurt Vile and The Soft Pack in support of Purling Hiss’ new album, Public Service Announcement.) Tonight at Kung Fu Necktie, however, he’s back with his main band, the loud-as-hell blues-rock trio, Birds Of Maya; Australia’s Taco Leg (yes, the band is really called “Taco Leg”) opens (8 p.m., 21+, $6). Finally, An American Chinese—which John Vettese highlighted last week in the Philly Local Philes (“Metropolitan” off the band’s new Utopian Trees is definitely worth checking out)—performs with Univox and The Naked Hearts at Danger Danger Gallery (8 p.m.)

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The Key Studio Sessions: In Grenada breaks free from its inner Springsteen

In GrenadaPerhaps you noticed it too: the frayed-denim melody, the working-class urgency, the howl. When In Grenada launched into an untitled, organ-led number to open their Key Studio Session last month—having requested Nebraska levels of reverb on top of everything else—I had to ask: Is it possible to be a band from Jersey without some Springsteen influence seeping in? “It is!” responded singer-guitarist Jesse Leyh. “Another couple bands from Jersey that have really influenced me over the years are The Feelies and The Bongos, and neither of those two bands sound anything like Springsteen. I kinda try to find a happy medium.” Good answer, man. You can’t deny their roots, but aligning In Grenada merely to the obvious parallel overlooks a whole lot: the thundering post-punk toms on “Keep That River Running Home,” the spirited pre-alternative guitar jangle of “Distance and Temptation,” the rustic pop reimagining of “It Doesn’t Matter.” Every time I dig into their debut Break, some new facet hops out; seeing them perform, even moreso. Curious? They’re at Johnny Brenda’s tonight, opening for Summer Fiction.

Support for The Key Studio Sessions, from Dogfish Head
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Tonight’s Concert Pick: In Grenada and Creeping Weeds at Kung Fu Necktie

In Grenada

Break, the debut LP by local quartet In Grenada, has been in steady rotation on my MP3 player since it was re-released five weeks ago. (And that’s saying a lot—seeing as how a slew of other great new albums by local acts have been released in that time, considerably beefing up the competition for my oh-so-precious auditory attention.) Apparently, I’m just a sucker for jangly-guitar-driven pop with “whoa-ooh” backing vocals—both of which the track “Hills (Flooded Valleys)” (available for free download via the band’s Bandcamp page) has plenty to spare. The same goes for local quartet Creeping Weeds, which opens the show with a set of gentle indie-rock accentuated by sighing vocal harmonies.  In Grenada performs with Bridges And Powerlines and Creeping Weeds at 8 p.m. at Kung Fu Necktie; tickets to the 21+ show are $5.

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In Grenada’s Break: A debut album so nice, they’re releasing it twice

In Grenada

In Grenada‘s debut album, Break—which the local pop quartet self-released earlier this year—is set for an officially official national release tomorrow. Which means, if you didn’t pick up a copy back in July at the band’s record-release show (with Busses and New Motels at Johnny Brenda’s), you’ve got no excuse not to do so now.

It also means any local music blogs that didn’t originally take note of the album the first time around (because, uh, they didn’t exist back then) have a perfect reason to cover it now. So look for our review of Break later this week. In the meantime, give a listen to the two tracks below, the album’s jangly opener “Distance And Temptation” and the “whoa-ooh”-backing-vocals-laden “Hills (Flooded Valleys).”