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Scariest set in the city? A look at Eastern State Penitentiary’s most famous videos

The Dead Milkmen's "Punk Rock Girl" video features Joe Jack Talcum singing in the Rotunda as Rodney Anonymous walking around the cellblocks of ESP reading a newspaper
The Dead Milkmen’s “Punk Rock Girl” video features Joe Jack Talcum singing in the Rotunda as Rodney Anonymous walking around the cellblocks of ESP reading a newspaper

Most Philadelphians are familiar with Fairmount’s massive landmark Eastern State Penitentiary. The looming structure, which closed in 1971 after 142 years as a prison, reopened in 1994 for guided tours, and has since become a destination for thrill-seekers during Bastille Day and Halloween season. However, beyond the zombie-fied chaos, the space itself offers an amazing backdrop for, well, anything.  We decided to look back at a few ways musicians and other visual artists have used ESP over the last few decades. Continue reading →

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Made in America day one blasts off with Kanye West, The National, J Cole, Mayer Hawthorne and more

Kanye West | Photo by John Vettese
Kanye West at Made in America | Photo by John Vettese

This year’s Made in America festival kicked off yesterday with an exhilarating lineup of performers along the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. The day spanned 11 hours and a spectrum of genres, from the discofied openers in Cherub to the hardcore punk / metal of Glassjaw; EDM hitmaker Baauer to funky fresh hiphop vet Big Daddy Kane; sweet soul grooves from Mayer Hawthorne to an explosive set from The National. And of course, the man of the hour was Kanye West, whose closing 90-minute performance was at peak energy throughout. Continue reading →

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The Key’s Year-End Mania: Sameer Rao’s Top 5 Musical Gut-Punches of 2013

Photo courtesy of Sean Agnew
Photo courtesy of Sean Agnew

Year End Mania is the Key’s survey of the things below the surface that made 2013 awesome. In this installment, contributing writer Sameer Rao talks about songs that make you feel.

For those who are true monsters, hardened against moments that expose you for the vulnerable and fragile human that you really are, please stop reading here.

For the rest of us, we occasionally crack at the wail of a guitar, the cry of a love-lorn singer, or the naked clarity of a synthline (or, more often, all of the above). I call these moments “gut-punches” – musical cues that can stop you in your tracks or make you uncontrollably sob in the middle of a friend’s Christmas party, screaming “It’s just so beautiful!” as you wipe your snot-encrusted nose with that ugly sweater you bought just for that occasion.

Moments like this confirm why music in the age of digital reproduction can still be powerful and transcendent, and I masochistically yearn for them with every new record I listen to. Fortunately, we had a bunch of great ones this year. I’ll try not to stain my shirt as I run down the list of 2013’s Top 5 Musical Gut-Punches.

5. Little Big League – “Tokyo Drift” from These are Good People

The exemplary debut full-length from Philly’s own Little Big League is filled with moments that compel you to scream out for jilted love, but this song was a personal stand-out. It’s a song that evolved in texture throughout live performances from the past two years, blending classic shoegaze and 90s melodic rock into a volatile cocktail that threatens to overflow through the song’s delay-heavy bridge. Just when you think you’ll punch a hole in the drywall, squeals of feedback withdraw into singer Michelle Zauner’s haunting and understated soprano before the song gracefully shimmers into thin air. You’re left coming to terms with your own power, or your shattered hand in the drywall – either way, you’re still grateful to be alive.

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Yeezus meets Jesus: Kayne West at Wells Fargo Center

Photo courtesy of Sean Agnew
Photo courtesy of Sean Agnew

Hip-hop superstar Kanye West held high concept court at the Wells Fargo Center on Saturday night. The tour had been postponed, and several dates were cancelled after a truck accident damaged equipment, but it resumed in Philadelphia to seemingly no problems.

The concert was equal parts performance art and a religiously themed experimental noise rap show. For approximately 2 and 1/2 hours, West was incendiary and powerful, rolling out a solid 28-song set list that mixed all the songs from his recent album, Yeezus, with the hits, four mask changes, and a special appearance by Jesus. The rap firebrand, backed by a three piece “band” (who contributed programming, backing vocals, keyboard and guitar playing), came out on stage after twelve women (his “disciples”) covered in white prayer robes walked in syncopation onto the stage as the noisy intro to “On Sight” began.

Photo courtesy of Sean Agnew
Photo courtesy of Sean Agnew

The stage show was elaborate. A 60 foot high mountain, which towards the end of the show would erupt with fireworks and blasts of fire, looked over a walkway where West performed for most of the evening (save when he climbed the mountain). Hovering over Mount Kanye was a circular screen where closeups of Kanye and the dancers would be projected with pre-recorded scenes of the sky including rushing clouds, a sunset, and snow. It was a breathtaking visual compliment to the new material.

There was a loose narrative to the evening’s program. It was divided into five sections, Fighting, Rising, Falling, Searching and Finding. With each new chapter, a female robotic voice would blast through the soundsystem, introducing each section while her description was projected in words on the circular screen above the stage. The dancers appeared throughout the evening. They alternated their robes with see-through flesh-toned head-to-toe body suits, walked slowly and at times creepily, reminiscent of the women in the classic Hammer Horror Dracula movies. Most of the time, the choreography felt stiff and forced, did little to give lift to the emotional intensity of West’s performance and got in the way of the song transitions (which could have given the show a quicker pace).

Throughout the show, West donned four masks, singing underneath them. Perhaps he was quietly making a point about identity and perception, however he reflected on his own self-perception and the media’s perception of him. At one point he delivered a rant, but also a soliloquy, about slavery. As the religious iconography continued, there came a corny yet climactic point in the show when White Jesus appeared, walked up to Black Jesus, held his head and – in a bit of overacting – Kanye rose from his knees and took the last mask off his head. The crowd loved the moment, and erupted in near deafening excitement.

Kanye West wears four masks during Yeezus tour in Seattle. Photo: Splash News/Instagram
Kanye West wears four masks during Yeezus tour in Seattle. Photo: Splash News/Instagram
Photo by Max Warren
Photo by Max Warren

While the staging and story arc were innovative and creative, West ultimately doesn’t need these elements of theater to provide the drama or the story line. On his own, sans Mount Kanye and his follower souls, under the spotlight, West provides enough of his own theater. His performance of both the new material, especially on “New Slaves,” “Blood On The Leaves,” “Black Skinhead,” and the closing “Bound 2,” proved why he’s one of the greatest rappers of our time. Some of the older material, like “Mercy,” and “Clique” were throwaways for the fans. Most of the “hits” came towards the end of the show and these underscored West’s importance as a rapper and songwriter.

Compton rapper Kendrick Lamar opened the show with an explosive set of songs from his recent album Good Kid: M.A.A.D. City, backed by an exceptional live band. Two summers ago, few music fans knew about Lamar, and since then his stature in the hip-hop world has grown to dizzying, well-deserved heights. On Saturday, he came to impress, and treated the them half-filled audience to classics from his recent album like “Backseat Freestyle,” “Poetic Justice,” and the poignant, “Sing About Me, I’m Dying Of Thirst.” Continue reading →

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Kendrick Lamar added to Kanye West show at Wells Fargo Center on November 16th

Kendrick Lamar | Photo by John Vettese
Kendrick Lamar at Made In American 2013 | Photo by John Vettese

This is going to be one amazing hip-hop show: Kendrick Lamar has been added as the opener to the Kanye West show on November 16th at the Wells Fargo Center. Go here for tickets. Last night, Lamar was on the BET hip-hop awards with ScHoolboy Q, Jay Rock, Ab-Soul and Isaiah Rashad. Check out the video below (explicit language alert!)

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Watch Kanye West perform “Bound 2″ on Jimmy Fallon (playing the Wells Fargo Center on 11/16)

kayne_west_live_31_01_13

Because the only predictable thing about Kanye is that he is unpredictable, the rapper made a surprise visit to Late Night with Jimmy Fallon last night to perform “Bound 2″ off of Yeezus.  West was backed by Fallon’s house band The Roots and joined by R&B superstar Charlie Wilson (who appeared on the album track as well).  Bouyed by a soulful children’s choir and Wilson’s expert scatting, West’s first-ever performance on Fallon’s show is nothing short of stellar.  He’ll bring his Yeezus tour to the Wells Fargo Center on November 16th; ticket on-sale information is still forthcoming but more information will be available here.  Watch the video of West performing “Bound 2″ below.

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Kanye West’s first solo tour in five years comes to Wells Fargo Center on 11/16

The thing about Kanye West: he knows how to make an impression. There was the benefit for Hurricane Sandy relief last year, when West’s set was maybe 20 minutes and jam-packed with a rapid-fire montage of hit after hit; it’s like he rushed the stage and threw down full force (possibly to the chagrin of the staunch rockers who just wanted to see Springsteen and McCartney, but whatever). Then there was the headline-grabbing set at Revel in Atlantic City, where he rapped in a mysterious series of ornate masks. And let’s not forget the series of projections around the globe to promote his lates album Yeezus; it was a bit sensational, but it got your attention.

Point being: Kanye is a top-notch performer, and know’s how to get the masses turning his way. Which makes the announcement of his first solo tour in five years an exciting deal – even if Yeezus was, ultimately, more hype than substance, dude has an incredible back-catalgoue to pull from. The tour comes to Philly on November 16th, and while Philly is not one of the cities slated to get an opening set from Kendrick Lamar, there is some mention of a special guest – which, from Kanye, could mean just about anything. Ticket onsale info is still TBA; below, watch Kanye performing “New Slaves” on SNL earlier this year.

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Remembering Live 8 in Philly on July 2, 2005

Photo: TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images
Photo: TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images

On this date in 2005, the Live 8 concerts were held around the world, including at the Philadelphia Art Museum and Benjamin Franklin Parkway. Celebrating the 20th anniversary of Live Aid, performers in Philly included Stevie Wonder, DJ Jazzy Jeff and the Fresh Prince, Linkin Park with Jay-Z, Dave Matthews, Bon Jovi, Destiny’s Child, the Black Eyed Peas, Maroon 5, Sarah McLachlan, Def Leppard, Alicia Keys, Rob Thomas (of Matchbox 20), Toby Keith, and Kanye West (who performed with string section who wore Long Ranger-styled strips of black tape over their eyes). Some highlights below.

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Where to see (or avoid seeing) Kanye West’s new video projection in Philly tonight

kanye-featLove Kanye West, hate him or occupy some ever-fluctuating middle ground (that’s me), you’ve got to give the dude credit for continuing to strive for new and creative ways of pushing his art into the world. Of late, his thing is music video projections on the faces of buildings in cities around the world. This began last Friday with his single “New Slaves” in 66 different locations, and continues tonight, as Consequence of Sound reports – with Philadelphia being one of the spots this time.

The gang at Philly.com rounded up the Philadelphia locations for tonight’s video projections, all of which take place between 10 and 11 p.m., all of which are Parkway-centric. So depending on how you feel about Kanye, you might want to make your plans to visit Eastern State Penitentary, The Barnes Foundation or the Franklin Institute tonight…or you might want to make plans to avoid them entirely. Below, watch Kanye performing “New Slaves” on SNL last weekend.

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Tonight’s Concert Picks: Kanye West at Revel Ovation Hall, Rebirth Brass Band at The Blockley, Kalob Griffin Band at Chameleon Club

Photo by Kristian Dowling

Tireless entertainer Kanye West brings his bright and bold live show to Atlantic City’s Revel Ovation Hall for the final night of a three-night stand. Though West did not have a proper solo release this year, he appeared on Cruel Summer, a compilation showcasing the roster of his G.O.O.D. Music label; plus, he’s still riding high on Watch The Throne, the outstanding collaborative album he released with Jay-Z last year. More information on the show can be found here. Friday’s opening night show made some headlines when West appeared onstage in a diamond-encrusted mask, later swapping it out for a mask-and-powered-wig combo that Fuse compared to a Yeti. Check out a video below and decide for yourself.

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