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Aug 15 in Music History: Woodstock begins, Led Zeppelin release In Through the Out Door

Led Zeppelin In Through the Out Door

 

1955 – Elvis Presley signs a contract that names Colonel Tom Parker his “special advisor” with control over virtually every aspect of Elvis’ career. Parker is not really a Colonel at all, but a Dutch immigrant named Andreas Cornelius van Kujik, whose honorary title was given to him in 1948 by Governor Jimmie Davis of Louisiana. Parker’s pre-Elvis experience includes promoting carnival and medicine shows such as The Great Parker Pony Circus and Tom Parker And His Dancing Turkeys. His management of Presley becomes the defining role of masterminding talent management, which involves every facet of the client’s life and is seen as central to the success of Presley’s career.

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Aug 7 in Music History: Stevie Wonder releases Signed Sealed & Delivered, John Lennon begins recording his final album

Stevie Wonder Signed Sealed Delivered

1957 – The Quarry Men play at The Cavern Club in Liverpool without Paul McCartney, who is away at Boy Scout summer camp. Skiffle was tolerated though The Cavern was still a jazz club, but when John Lennon dares to play “Hound Dog” and “Blue Suede Shoes,” the club owner sends a note to the stage that says, “Cut out the bloody rock!”

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Iconic singer-songwriter Paul Simon rules the night at the Mann Center

Paul Simon | photo by Josh Pelta-Heller for WXPN | instagram.com/hellerhound
Paul Simon | photo by Josh Pelta-Heller for WXPN | instagram.com/hellerhound

This August marks the thirtieth anniversary of Graceland, Paul Simon’s landmark, multi-platinum-selling, Grammy-award-winning album, an inspired and innovative patchwork quilt of world music styles recorded with talent like the Everly Brothers, Los Lobos, Linda Ronstadt, and several South African recording artists including the Boyoyo Boys Band and The Gaza Sisters, whom he’d met during a trip to Johannesburg with longtime friend and producer Roy Halee.

Without fanfare or announcement about the occasion, Simon leaned heavily on that material during last Saturday’s sold-out show at the Mann Music Center. His two-dozen song set featured half of that record, opening with “The Boy In The Bubble” and landing on “Diamonds On The Soles Of Her Shoes” and the enduring “You Can Call Me Al” before his encore break. Continue reading →