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Tonight’s Concert Picks: Florist at Boot & Saddle, Baby and Shylow at Kung Fu Necktie, Philly Loves Animals at World Cafe Live

Florist | photo via florist.bandcamp.com

Synth-folk outfit Florist released their soft and beautiful LP If Blue Could Be Happiness last month, and its intricate and gentle songs are the perfect soundtrack for a cozy fall night at Boot & Saddle. With Philly locals Hello Shark and Yowler (who are playing their first-ever full band set) opening the show, it’s a full lineup of introspective and contemplative sounds. Listen to the delicate “Blue Mountain Road” below, and find tickets and more information on the XPN Concert Calendar. Continue reading →

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Sept 14 in Music History: Genesis make their live debut, Counting Crows release August and Everything After

Counting Crows August and Everything After

1955 – Little Richard enters a New Orleans studio to begin two days of recording. The sessions don’t start well, but they end fantastically. During a break, he and his producer Bumps Blackwell go to the Dew Drop Inn for lunch. Richard starts wildly playing the piano in the bar, singing a loud and lewd version of “Tutti Frutti.” With only fifteen minutes left in the session, Richard records this version of the song with the phrase, “a-wop-bop-a-loo-bop-a-lop-bam-boom.”

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April 6 in Music History: Carly Simon and James Taylor meet, Bruce Hornsby releases his first solo album

Bruce Hornsby Harbor Lights

1956 – Capitol Tower, the home of Capitol Records in Hollywood, CA, is dedicated. Resembling a stack of records, it is the first circular office tower designed in America. It is 13 stories tall and 92 feet in diameter, housing three new recording studios where Frank Sinatra, Bobby Darin, Linda Ronstadt, and many other stars will lay down tracks. The building becomes an LA landmark, with the red light at the top flashing “HOLLYWOOD” in Morse Code.

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Download the audio for Pink Floyd’s flawless performance at The Spectrum in 1973

The Dark Side of the Moon is  Pink Floyd’s greatest commercial success. This is the LP with the famous cover art of light refracting through a triangular prism, an image so iconic it is almost universally recognizable due to the massive reach of the album. The record focused on correlating themes of mental health, greed, death and conflict, among others. These were topics that had been previously explored by the psych-rockers, but were never incorporated in such a direct manner as was used in this 1973 release. Continue reading →