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Just Announced: Red Hot Chili Peppers and Trombone Short will play Wells Fargo Center

Red Hot Chili Peppers | Photo by John Vettese for WXPN
Hold on to your seats, people — it might get funky.

California-till-they-die alternative rock heroes Red Hot Chili Peppers just announced a major headlining show in Philadelphia on February 12th, 2017 at the Wells Fargo Center. The band’s latest LP, The Getaway, came out back in June, and their tour in support of it has them joined by the ever-entertaining Trombone Shorty and Orleans Avenue. Continue reading →

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This Day in Music History: The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan is released, Red Hot Chili Peppers get their first #1 album 22 years into their career

The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan

1957 – Buddy Holly and the Crickets release their first record, “That’ll Be The Day,” which goes to #1 in the UK and #3 in the US. The song is inspired by John Wayne’s frequently-used, world-weary catchphrase, “That’ll be the day,” in his movie The Searchers, which Holly, Jerry Allison, and Sonny Curtis had seen in June 1956. It is also the first song to be recorded by The Quarrymen, the skiffle group that subsequently becomes The Beatles.

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XPN MusicNotes: Go-Go’s farewell tour, Chili Pepper’s new album, & Guns & Roses’ secret show?

After 39 years the Go Go’s are going bye-bye but not before one last farewell tour that will hit Philly, Bethlehem and North Jersey. Continue reading →

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Despite the thin turnout, an energized Atoms for Peace kicked off a U.S. tour at Liacouras Center

atoms17Thom Yorke, Flea, Nigel Godrich, Joey Waronker, and Mauro Refosco waltzed into Temple University’s Liacouras Center last night to begin the North American Atoms for Peace tour. It was no ordinary night for rock: you had members of the three “R’s” – Radiohead, Red Hot Chili Peppers, and R.E.M. – joining forces. It was also not ordinary since Philadelphia failed to show these music luminaries the respect they deserved.

The venue was far from capacity – and only half of the University’s basketball arena was used in the first place – with the general admission floor not sold out and the top sections being a semi-barren wasteland. And the clientele who did come did not seem to understand an encore break – scores left after the first encore when it should have been quite obvious Yorke and company were about to return and lay down some more serious alternative beats. Despite the negatives, Atoms for Peace played a solid and impressive set, drawing on their album, Yorke’s solo album The Eraser, and a few other choice cuts, like Radiohead’s “Paperbag Writer” and UNKLE’s “Rabbit in Your Headlights.”

Yorke and Flea bounced about the stage with their childlike abandon aided by the one-two percussive punch of Waronker and Refosco and the keys and strings of Godrich. And with it being a Yorke-led band, the lighting was bound to amaze with its rich reds, blues, and greens bathing the electronica and rock amalgam with a touch of otherworldliness. And as the show came to a close with a stunning combo of “Atoms for Peace” and “Black Swan,” during which Flea brandished a Temple basketball jersey to cover his skirt/kilt apparel from earlier, the power of the message implied in the band’s title comes into clear focus: amongst the turmoil and din of the everyday, one will find a unifying beat of peace. The future cities to be visited will hopefully be more open and understanding for this experience than our own Philadelphia.

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