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Fourplay bassist Nathan East talks touring with Clapton and making time for solo work

Nathan East | photo courtesy of the artist via www.nathaneast.com/media
Nathan East | photo courtesy of the artist via www.nathaneast.com/media

When Fourplay released their first album in 1991, there was little doubt that the term “supergroup” was applicable. By that time, keyboardist Bob James had been recording hit albums for nearly two decades, had played a major role in creating the sound that would come to be known as smooth jazz, and had contributed the memorable theme song for the sitcom Taxi. Guitarist Lee Ritenour could boast a fifteen-year career as a leader, increasingly fusing jazz with pop music. And drummer Harvey Mason had been a member of Herbie Hancock’s ground-breaking Headhunters band and played with a who’s who of jazz greats besides releasing a string of funky albums under his own name in the late ‘70s and early ‘80s on Arista Records.

Which just left bassist Nathan East, who didn’t yet have a single recording under his own name – and still didn’t in 2012, when Fourplay released its twelfth studio album, Esprit de Four. But for those who pay attention to liner notes, it was clear that East had earned his place in this heavy-hitting quartet. One of the most in-demand session musicians of the last three decades, East has contributed to countless hit records, including songs and albums by Michael Jackson, Stevie Wonder, Sting, Elton John, George Harrison, Anita Baker, Babyface, and B.B. King. He’s been an integral part of Eric Clapton’s sound since 1984, recording and touring with the legendary guitarist, and wrote the music for Phil Collins and Philip Bailey’s 1984 hit “Easy Lover.” This year, he contributed the bassline for Daft Punk’s “Get Lucky” and performed the song with the robotic duo at the Grammys.

When Fourplay arrives at the Keswick on Wednesday, it will be the first time the band has played in the Philly area since East finally joined his bandmates as a recording artist in his own right, with the release of Nathan East earlier this year. The belated debut is a grab bag of styles performed by a band of top L.A. session musicians with favors returned by a number of artists East has anchored over the years, including Clapton, Stevie Wonder, Michael McDonald, and Bob James. Smooth jazz is followed by a funk tune, a Stevie Wonder cover or two, a gauzy ballad, a straightahead bop number, a sunny bossa nova, or a rousing, string-laden solo bass rendition of “America the Beautiful.”

“I programmed the album as if I was programming my iPod, where you get a little bit of this and a bit of that,” East says. “I wanted it to be something that could stand up to repeat listenings, with the  fingerprints of the people I’ve been working with.”

East says that the reason it’s taken him so long to finally put out his own CD is simply the obvious fact that he’s been too busy. How many musicians, after all, can boast of a discography that includes Eric Clapton’s “Tears in Heaven,” Michael Jackson’s “Bad,” Whitney Houston’s “Greatest Love of All,” Beyoncé’s “Listen,” Randy Newman’s “I Love L.A.,” and Kenny Loggins’ “Footloose,” just to name a select few. Besides, he’s not the type to chase after the spotlight. “For me, it’s always been exciting to know that you’re part of this big picture, to know that you’re a part of the fabric of music,” East says. “My ego doesn’t really make me wish I was in the front of that. Sometimes if it’s a great record I’ll wish I wrote it, but most times I just enjoy the fact that I played a little bit of a role in this big puzzle called music.”

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Jonny Lang packs World Cafe Live for Free At Noon

Photos by Elizabeth Mazenko
Photos by Elizabeth Mazenko

Blues rocker Jonny Lang drew a large crowd for his Free At Noon performance on World Cafe Live’s stage. Giving a taste of his soul deep within, Lang played a set that drew from his new CD Fight for My Soul and close with the rousing single “Lie To Me,” which got the whole crowd roaring for more. If you missed him today, catch him tonight at The Keswick Theater in Glenside; tickets and details can be found here. Check out the photo gallery above, the set list below and listen to the entire performance here (via the WXPN media player).

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Recap: Celebrating the past and looking to the future with Lucinda Williams at The Keswick Theater

Lucinda Williams | Photo by Chris Sikich | countfeed.tumblr.com All photos by Chris Sikich | countfeed.tumblr.com

Lucinda Williams gave a nearly sold-out crowd at The Keswick Theatre a glorious slice of her musical history on Saturday night. There was the promised retelling of her self-titled third album released 25 years ago to begin the night. Those 12 songs depict Williams’ strengths in the country realm, with hints of rock and blues throughout. Williams and her band, featuring Stuart Mathis on guitar, expertly showcased the album, name-dropping those who covered such classics as “The Night’s Too Long” (Patty Loveless), “Changed the Locks” (Tom Petty), and “Passionate Kisses” (Mary Chapin Carpenter). But this was not a show about hubris; it was about her shifting contexts and fantastic contributions to the world of music. Her last 10 songs certainly had a greater edge of rock. This was seen most dramatically on “Joy” and the title track to her last album, 2011’s Blessed, which was sandwiched between two stunning covers in the encore: J.J. Cale’s “Magnolia” and Neil Young’s “Rockin’ in the Free World.” Beyond the musical genres, though, Williams truly showcased her poetic voice, as found in such works as “Lake Charles” and “Righteously,” where she put down her guitar to focus on the raplike delivery. The hints of her next album in the unreleased “Something Wicked This Way Comes” distilled her essence into three solid minutes, leaving the audience with the knowledge that so much more greatness is on the horizon. And as Williams, Mathis and company jammed within the confines of Young’s masterpiece to close out the night, Williams’ identity crystalized into that of a vessel for hope and courage in the greatest and toughest of times.

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Just Announced: Colin Meloy of The Decemberists to Play Solo at The Keswick Theater on 11/2

1331Colin Meloy, lead singer of The Decemberists just announced that he is embarking on a solo tour.  This is the first time he has toured alone in about five years.  The ten-date tour has Melow debuting new material, performing tracks from across his career, and showcasing a new EP of covers.  Among the stops is suburban Montgomery County, where he will play at The Keswick Theater in Glenside on Novermber 2nd.  Tickets for the show go on sale this Friday.  In the meantime, get pumped for his solo tour by watching Meloy play all three parts of The Crane Wife below.

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Tonight’s Concert Picks: PAWS at Morgan’s Pier, The Go-Go’s at The Keswick Theater, Roosevelt Dime at The Tin Angel

PAWS

PAWS kick-off the free summer concert series at Morgan’s Pier tonight.  Hailing from various corners of Scotland, the garage rock  trio released their FatCat debut LP Cokefloat! in 2012 and were met with overwhelmingly positive reviews from both sides of the ocean.  With a retro nineties sound that brings to mind the best of Stephen Malkmus and J Mascis, PAWS are band best seen live (where their guitars can really squeal).  More information about tonight’s free show with We Were Promised Jetpacks can be found here.  Watch PAWS perform “Sore Tummy” below.

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Photo Recap: B.B. King at The Keswick Theater

All photos by Chris Sikich | countfeed.tumblr.com

Blues legend B.B. King performed at Glenside’s Keswick Theater last night with six-piece backing band and his trademark guitar, Lucille. Baton Rouge singer-guitarist Jonathon “Boogie” Long opened the show; check out scenes from both performances in the gallery above.

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Tonight’s Concert Picks: Bobby Long at World Cafe Live, B.B. King at The Keswick Theater, Vandaveer at Johnny Brenda’s

Bobby3-LargeTouring in support of his latest releases – the Wishbone LP and the Bedroom EP – British singer-songwriter Bobby Long plays World Cafe Live tonight. Mixing downtempo country and rockabilly with a decidedly retro bent, Long has built a growing stateside fan base since his 2009 debut Dirty Pond Songs. Tickets and information on the all-ages show can be found at the WXPN concert calendar. Below, download “Devil Moon” from Wishbone.

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Photo Recap: Rodriguez and Jenny O at The Keswick Theater

Photos by Chris Sikich | countfeed.tumblr.com

Resurgent American songwriter Sixto Rodriguez and his three-piece band performed for a sold-out crowd at The Keswick Theater last night. This round of U.S. tour dates came in the wake of Searching for Sugar Man, the 2012 film about Rodriguez, took home the best documentary trophy at this year’s Academy Awards. Opening the show was Los Angeles singer-songwriter Jenny O; check out scenes from the evening in the photo gallery above.

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Dark crooner Nick Cave takes command of the Keswick Theater (review, photos, setlist)

Nick Cave doesn’t have time for your crap. He has a reputation to uphold, after all – that of the cranky, occasionally combative, vocally stunning and lyrically intense crooner from Australia who has explored songwriting’s dark side in a stately manner for over three decades. Try to take an up-close Instagram of him during his set at The Keswick Theater last night? He’ll shove that iPhone right out of his face and holler at you to put it the eff away. Heckle him? He’ll snap right back at you in a menacing tone. But cheer him on, and Cave is generous with his rewards, as the sold-out house in Glenside found.

The 90-minute set mixed up back-catalogue classics with material from the downtempo (but nonetheless tense) new album Push The Sky Away – “We Know Who U R” was a gentle sing-song opener took a smooth glide into “Jubilee Street.” Cave’s longtime backing band The Bad Seeds worked wonders on this song, rebuilding the simmering album version into a skyrocketing crescendo that was punctuated by Cave’s jack knife thrusts and jerking kicks over the front row. By the end of the song, he was in command of the theater.

“Higgs Bosun Blues” evolved in a similar fashion over eight minutes – he opened his South By Southwest show last week with this one – and by the time it peaked, Cave was warmed up. “Can we start getting these chairs out of here?” he asked of the folks sitting in folding seats in the front row, and as the floor opened up, he plowed into the crowd with his microphone in tow to the violent strains of “From Her to Eternity.” With the mic cable stretched as far as it would go, Cave settled more or less in the lap of an enthralled fan, gripping his collar and screaming the last minute and change of the song into his face.

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Watch a new music video for Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds’ “We No Who U R” (playing The Keswick on 3/19)

Talk about music videos matching the mood of a song. In this one from Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds, a camera follows a person’s shadow through a thick forest to the beautiful strains of “We No Who U R.” The mysterious track is from the band’s new LP Push the Sky Away, which will be released in February. The video was directed by Argentinean filmmaker Gaspar Noe, and Cave called the video “beautiful, haunting and thoughtful” in The Quietus. Watch it below. Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds will perform at The Keswick Theater on March 19; tickets and information are available here.

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