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Photos: Wrapping up Philly Folk Fest on Sunday with David Bromberg, Rev. Peyton and a fire drill

Gathered in the Dulcimer Grove, waiting out the fire evacuation | Photo by John Vettese
Gathered in the Dulcimer Grove, waiting out the fire evacuation | Photo by John Vettese

The Sunday lineup is typically the quiet denouement of Philly Folk Fest, but this year was jam-packed with happenings, including a rootsy wakeup set on the Camp Stage by Spirit Family Reunion; an impressive showing on the Tank Stage by Philly’s Up the Chain; a capella gospel harmonies from Como Mamas; and what MC Gene Shay later dubbed “a fire drill.”

A small fire broke out in the food vending area at the top of the hill on the main concert grounds, and the crowd was quietly rounded up by security and ushered off to either the craft area of Dulcimer Grove while the Upper Salford Fire Company was called in to dispense with the blaze. Meanwhile, impromptu performances by guitar-carrying Fest volunteers popped up in the grove while the crowd waited for a little over a half hour. (Evidently, Carolina Chocolate Drops also played an impromptu acoustic set while stuck backstage.)

A banjo lick from the CCD’s signaled that it was safe for everybody to return to the festival grounds, and the night wrapped up with sets from The Rev. Peyton’s Big Damn Band, David Bromberg and Asleep at the Wheel. Check out photos of the day in the gallery below, and don’t miss our week of festival coverage in The Key’s Week of Folk.

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Watch Todd Rundgren and David Uosikkinen’s In The Pocket perform “Open My Eyes” at Philly Folk Fest

Photo by John Vettese
Photo by John Vettese
Todd Rundgren and David Uosikkinen’s In The Pocket each performed a set at this year’s Philly Folk Festival on Saturday night, however, during the In The Pocket set, Rundgren came out to perform his classic “Open My Eyes,” which was one of the highlights of the night. Watch the video below, and check out our recap of the show here.

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The Key’s Week of Folk: Impressive Saturday sets from Spirit Family Reunion, Sierra Leone Refugee Allstars and The Mavericks

PFFSat29
Photo by John Vettese

This past Saturday at the Philadelphia Folk Festival was a breezy, sunny perfect summer day topped off with some excellent performances from some new names and familiar faces. XPN’s Helen Leicht curated and hosted the Camp Stage with performances from local musicians Ali Wadsworth, Juston Stens and The Get Reak Gang, Modern Inventors, Lile Mae, and Ginger Coyle. Over on the Lobby Stage, New York’s Spirit Family Reunion became everyone’s favorite new band, playing an upbeat set of folk-rock bluegrass Americana influenced stompers. On the Main Stage, the music got underway with local hero Ben Vaughn and his Quintet, and continued with excellent sets from Black Prairie(who were joined by Wesley Stace/John Wesley Harding), a high energy set from The Mavericks, and a gorgeous performance from the Sierra Leone Refugee All Stars. Ending the evening’s Main Stage performances were sets by Todd Rundgren and David Uosikkinen’s In The Pocket who were joined by Rundgren during their set. Photos by John Vettese and Abi Reimold.

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The Key’s Week of Folk: Faces and places at the 52nd Folk Festival

Photo by Abi Reimold | AbiReimoldPhoto.com
Photo by Abi Reimold | AbiReimoldPhoto.com

All photos by Abi Reimold | AbiReimoldPhoto.com

There is more to the annual Philadelphia Folk Festival than simply folk music. The four-day event in Upper Salford also showcases crafts, culinary delights and a world of culture; a diverse crowd of thousands takes it in every year. In the gallery below, photographer Abi Reimold captures faces, places and events from around the festival. Some of the sights you’ll see include a group cooling off in the Perkiomen Creek, a decades-long Fest attendee whose hat contains many of his badges from the years; a ukulele workshop with The Rev. T.J. McGlinchy; a performance by the Give and Take Jugglers with the Philadelphia School of Circus Arts, and much more.

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The Key’s Week of Folk: Richard Thompson, Ursula Rucker, The Lawsuits are Friday’s highlights

Richard Thompson | Photo by John Vettese
Richard Thompson | Photo by John Vettese

The Friday lineup at the 52nd Annual Philadelphia Folk Festival was eclectic and exciting, beginning with a cluster of Philadelphia music scene staples and wrapping up with electrifying and impressive performance from folk scene mainstay Richard Thompson.

The Lawsuits kicked off the day on the main stage with an assortment of songs from their forthcoming LP Cool Cool Cool; they were poppy, they were country, they were classic rock, with songwriter Brian Dale Allen Strouse stepping behind the Steinway for a snappy take on “Onion” and singer Vanessa Winters owning “Long Drive Home” with a twangy vocal.

Lancaster trio The Stray Birds performed an assortment of songs from the as-yet-untitled album they just finished recording last week, Marc Silver rocked out some songs from his new story-centered album A Miner’s Tale, andToy Soldiers tore across a lively set of bluesy rockabilly from their forthcoming sophomore LP The Maybe Boys, due out September 10th.

Poet Ursula Rucker’s collaborative set with Philly guitar wizard Tim Motzer was easily the day’s highlight. While she read (and occasionally sang) pieces addressing social justice, racial prejudice,. gender and identity (among other topics), Motzer played a hypnotic guitar backing. Her performance of “Philadelphia Child” was particularly moving, as was the concluding call-and-response of “Super Sista.”

After an enjoyable performance from Philly-area celtic crew Runa, Richard Thompson took the stage to a thinning (but devoted) crowd. Thompson has played the fest several times as a solo artist; this time he was with his electric trio, which began on a jarringly funky note, but quickly settled into a groove that let Thompson’s guitar skills shine through. His nimble guitar shredding was impressive, “Shoot Out The Lights” backed by the band packed a punch that the song lacks when Thompson plays it solo. And his solo stab at “1952 Vincent Black Lightning,” while not unexpected, didn’t disappoint either. Check out photos from the day in the gallery below.

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The Key’s Week of Folk: A World Cafe campground spectacular with Star & Micey and more

Star and Micey | Photo by John Vettese
Star and Micey | Photo by John Vettese
Last night the 52nd Annual Philadelphia Folk Festival kicked off as it always does – with a live taping of XPN’s World Cafe with David Dye.

This year, David’s featured guest was Nashville four-piece Luella and the Sun. The honky-tonk blues four-piece was fronted by the stylish and charismatic Melissa Mathes, aka Luella, who had a tremendous stage presence, a voice straight out of gospel and a dress assembled from plastic six-pack rings.

Their performance left a positive impression on the crowd, many of whom were on their feet and dancing by the close. New England gypsy swing band Caravan of Thieves also played an enjoyable opening set, though it wasn’t as warmly received by the trickling-in audience (many of whom were still staking their tents when the band went on.)

The undeniable stars of the show, though, were eclectic Memphis four-piece Star & Micey. They were impossible to pin down to a style; their set started with a cappella ’round-the-drumset riff on Dylan, then launched into boisterous indie-pop (“Love”), twangy nods to Hank Williams (“So Much Pain”), bootstomp blues (“I Can’t Wait”) and probably three or four other genres in between.

Best of all was their energy; guitarist Nick Redmond cracked “my grandma warned me never to do this” before taking a backflip into the crowd. Meanwhile the whole band descended into the audience to play their encore off-mic. The revved-up vibe of the night-time campground show lent itself well to the band’s vivaciousness, but we expect they’d be this much of a blast anywhere; can’t wait till the next time. Meantime, check out photos of the showcase in the gallery below.

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The Key’s Week of Folk: John Hartford’s classic 1971Aereo-Plain to get the full album tribute treatment at #PFF2013

left to right: John Hartford, Norman Blake, Tut Taylor
left to right: John Hartford, Norman Blake, Tut Taylor

The Key’s Week of Folk is our series of interviews, reviews, artist spotlights, playlistings and general ephemera to get you ready for the 52nd Annual Philadelphia Folk Festival, happening now through this Sunday at Old Pool Farm in Schwenksville.

In 1971, folk/country/bluegrass singer-songwriter John Hartford released his groundbreaking Aereo-Plain album on Warner Brothers Records. For many, it become the blueprint (a very early one at that) for “newgrass.” No Depression, who says Hartford put the “American in Americana,” assembled a band of virtuoso players and acoustic music legends: Norman Blake, Vassar Clements, Tut Taylor, Randy Scruggs (son of bluegrass / country legend Earl Scruggs). The album was produced by David Bromberg. Old timey, eccentric, often tender yet equally as bizarre, Aereo-Plain was richly steeped in folk tradition. The album has some of Hartford’s most memorable songs on it including “Boogie,” “Turn The Radio On,” and “First Girl I Loved.” All this from the same musician who wrote the classic mainstream Grammy award winning pop hit “Gentle On My Mind.”

aereoplain

Tomorrow at the Philly Folk Festival (2:30PM at the Craft Stage), Hartford’s Aereo-Plane gets the album tribute treatment by a group of Philly’s most talented players: Phil D’Agostino, Brad Hinton, Jay Ansill and Michael Beaky. John Vettese of The Key reached out via e-mail to Phil and Brad to hear more about the project and to get their perspective on the importance of the album. Continue reading →

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The Key’s Week of Folk: Unearthing rare 70s treasures with new Philly reissue label Folk Evaluation

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Hoi Polloi recording in the Runyan Center at Earlham College in 1972

The Key’s Week of Folk is our series of interviews, reviews, artist spotlights, playlistings and general ephemera to get you ready for the 52nd Annual Philadelphia Folk Festival, happening August 16th to August 18th at Old Pool Farm in Schwenksville. In this installment, we introduce you to Folk Evaluation, a new Philly-based reissue label launching at Johnny Brenda’s on Friday.

Some forty years ago at the Indiana liberal arts school Earlham College, a group of students and budding musicians set out to make a record. It’s a scenario not unlike many that played out thousands of times at thousands of colleges around the globe in the decades since. Sometimes these recordings pave the way for successful music careers and mass-popularity, other times they don’t connect and the artists simply drift into obscurity. And every once in a rare while, they’re unearthed and reconsidered by a new generation of listeners.

Jordan Burgis and Jason Henn are Philly musicians and music obsessives whose enthusiasm for these old weird unknowns led them to found Folk Evaluation, a reissue label that last week launched with released a vinyl edition of the 1973 self-titled LP by Hoi’ Polloi; the aforementioned band from Earlham College. The two friends have deep ties to the local folk / psych scene; both play in indie-psych orchestra Folklore, Burgis has recorded LPs by Daniel Bachman and Weyes Blood, Henn plays in Honey Radar and is responsible for booking the only Philadelphia appearance by underground rock recluse Jandek.

“It’s just something about people who are into weird, obscure music,” Brugis says. “We can sniff each other out.” Continue reading →

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The Key’s Week of Folk: David Dye previews World Cafe’s campground concert with Luella and the Sun and more!

LuellaThe Key’s Week of Folk is our series of interviews, reviews, artist spotlights, playlistings and general ephemera to get you ready for the 52nd Annual Philadelphia Folk Festival, happening August 16th to August 18th at Old Pool Farm in Schwenksville. For this installment, David Dye tells us about tonight’s festival kickoff at his annual World Cafe campground concert.

The Thursday night campground stage kick-off to the Philadelphia Folk Festival has at least a couple of goals: To present a new artist that might be a little outside the usual folk fare and to be the best party of the entire fest.

Our World Cafe selections have been pretty good. Over the last few years we have had Deer Tick, The Felice Brothers, Amanda Shires, ukulele genius Jake Shimabukuro, and this year a great new blues-soaked artist we heard about on our Sense Of Place visit to Nashville, Luella and The Sun.

Luella is Melissa Mathes and she and guitarist Joe McMahan are the core of this band that brings blues, gospel and rock into the mix in kind of an unhinged way. Ann Powers from NPR is a fan. Tchad Blake produced their first single. They will make a new album later this summer, out next year. In other words they are perfect for the campground.

Caravan Of Thieves and their gypsy swing influenced pop open. And bringing the party is another band we met doing Sense of Place – Star and Micey from Memphis.

Continue reading →

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The Key’s Week Of Folk: Folkadelphia’s Fred Knittel on bridging the old-time, new-time, and all-time at #PFF2013

frank-fairfield-recordThe Key’s Week of Folk is our series of interviews, reviews, artist spotlights, playlistings and general ephemera to get you ready for the 52nd Annual Philadelphia Folk Festival, happening August 16th to August 18th at Old Pool Farm in Schwenksville. For this installment, we turned to one of our in-house folk music authorities for tips.

Folk music festivals, especially the Philadelphia Folk Festival, have always interested me in the way they bring together history and modernity. More so than other large music events, they really go ahead and just smash the two worlds together. And that’s what folk music is all about, drawing from the past, introducing (or re-introducing) in the present, and looking forward to what the future holds.

I spend a lot of time with my Singer-Songwriter (on XPN2) radio show Folkadelphia preaching about the malleability of the term “folk music” and what it means today; how it’s use to describe an artist doesn’t necessarily signal a particular sound.

This year at the Philadelphia Folk Festival, there are a number of acts and exhibitions that bridge the gap between the new and the old, and the traditional and the contemporary. Let these events shake up your preconceptions:

Frank Fairfield (Sat. at 1p Lobby Stage)
Fairfield looks and sounds like he just stepped out of a timewarp to the late 19th century. His music is steeped in tradition, yet I can’t help but notice a certain brash energy and playing that feels fresh.

Continue reading →

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